jayawijaya-peak-1

Eternal snow at the equator

(visitkhatulistiwa.com) – Indonesia, a country most of its territory is traversed by the equator, but has a region of perpetual snow. Located at the top of Jayawijaya mountain range, Papua, Indonesia. Jayawijaya peak or shorter called Puncak Jaya, has a height of up to 4,884 meters above sea level, thus allowing this area to be blanketed by eternal snow.

However, the eternal snow is expected to shrink, even dry. In a number of studies it was concluded that the ice deposits in these mountains from year to year experienced a serious shrinkage, caused by global warming. So, it is not impossible later this mountain will lose snow as happened to Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. Therefore, before the estimate really be real, there’s nothing wrong you try to conquer the highest peak in Indonesia.

READ THIS :  10 Best Indonesia Travel Destinations

Jayawijaya peak is one of the snow mountain peaks that exist in the equator crossing line, in addition to mountains in Africa and Latin America. When viewed from the air, Jayawijaya Peak looks like a black rug covered by a white hood. If the sun is bright, then the snow will reflect the dazzling sunlight. Ice content in the mountains is estimated to reach 5 percent of the world’s ice reserves outside the Antarctic Continent. But due to global warming, that number from year to year increasingly shrinking. If viewed from the type of glacier, snow area in Jayawijaya into Alpine Glaciation type. While glaciers (streams of snow) in this region fall into the Valley Glacier type, the flow of glaciers flowing from high to lower areas. Therefore, in this area there may be a stream of ice rivers.

Otherwise known as Puncak Jaya, the highest peak is also known as Carstensz Pyramide, or Peak Carstensz. the name was taken from a Dutch adventurer, Jan Carstensz, who first saw the peak of a snowy mountain in the tropics, precisely on the island of Papua. The observations were made by Jan Carstensz via a ship in 1623.because it can not be proven by direct observation, the report is considered to be making it up. For, for Europeans, finding snowy mountains in the tropics is almost impossible.

The peak is also listed as one of the seven continental peaks (Seven Summit) is very phenomenal and became the target of mountain climbers in various parts of the world. Jayawijaya peak is located in Laurentz National Park, Papua. This peak is covered with eternal snow. The eternal snow at Puncak Jayawijaya is one of three snow fields in the tropics of the world. In the country that passed this equator, witnessing the snow in Indonesia is certainly something impossible to understand. Carstenz pyramid (4884 mdpl) is one of the snowy peaks. The highest peak in Southeast Asia and the Pacific is located in the Sudirman Mountain range. This peak is famous not only because of its height, but also because there is a layer of snow at its peak.

CHECK THIS:  Labuan Bajo Flores, a dream place of tourist destinations

jayawijaya-peak-2
http://travellerhints.com/place/asia-china/indonesia/puncak-jaya/

Access manuju Attraction Jayawijaya Peak

Given the heavy climbing terrain, elaborate licensing processes, and security guarantees during the climbing process, climbers should utilize the services of experienced travel agencies. International travel agencies have provided two choices of climbing routes, the classic path through Ilaga Village, or a more convenient second line by helicopter to the base of Bukit Danau (Lake Valley).

The travel agency services will usually also handle licensing issues, transportation from Jakarta to Papua, helicopter rentals to base camp, climbing guides, insurance, as well as team practice and conditioning before the ascent. of course, the cost per person for a climbing team using a travel agent service costs a considerable amount, which is about 10,000 USD per person (or about a hundred million IDR or more). One more magical place on earth that is worth visiting. source: various sources

VISIT HERE :  The best place to enjoy spring season in Europe

2 thoughts on “Eternal snow at the equator”

Leave a Reply